Leopard Shark

Leopard Sharks Triakis Semifasciatus seem at first like the perfect shark for your salt water aquarium. They look great while small and look truly like a menacing ferocious shark. Thats the allure of the Leopard Shark.

The truth of the matter is that they grow quickly and that little 18″ shark won’t be little for long. Unless you are a Municipal Aquarium you will NOT be able to handle these sharks when they get big. The harsh Reality is that Leopard Sharks most frequently are caught off the coast of California and are  considered an endangered species. It is Unlawful to catch Leopard Sharks that are less then 3 feet in length and a violation of Federal Fish and Wildlife Regulations to keep a small one in captivity.

Just Rare Fish does not offer leopard sharks for sale.

Please visit our main shark page for our sharks for sale.

 

Labouti Wrasse

The Labouti Wrasse Cirrhilabrus Laboutei, also known as the Labouti Fairy Wrasse, is one of the rarer aquarium fish and is well sought after due to its mild disposition and great coloring.

Coming from New Caladonia and the area surrounding the Great Barrier Reef, the Labouti Wrasse likes a variety of foods including mysis shrimp and perhaps a good flake style food.

The Labouti Fairy Wrasse is highly sought after because of its beautiful coloring and its mild personality. It is rarely collected, however, being found at depths of 92-283 feet, rarely seen at depths shallower than 59 feet.

The Labouti Fairy Wrasse is a fairly hardy fish, but be sure to give it a long acclimation time between 1/2 and 1 1/2 hours.

Be sure to put a tight-fitting canopy on the tank, as this fish has earned its reputation for jumping out of open tanks. The tank should be at least 70 gallons with plenty of open swimming space and a lot of places to hide in the aquascaping.

Once the Labouti Fairy Wrasse gets used to being in your tank and feels comfortable, it will become one of the heartiest eaters in your community. It adapts easily to a carnivorous aquarium diet. It also needs some herbivore food (it eats planktons in the wild), and adapts to flaked foods and pellets.

This fish is a plankton feeder, and is not interested in corals or invertebrates. It usually doesn’t bother corals.

The Labouti Fairy Wrasse is noted for being a very peaceful fish, even among fairy wrasses. When it is first introduced, it will be shy, but as it gets used to its surroundings and community, it will become bolder and swim out in the open.

It is important to not add more than one male to the display tank. Their colors may become brighter and deeper in the presence of another male, but they will constantly fight each other.

If you plan to have female wrasses in the same tank (one male can be kept with several females), make sure to introduce them before or at the same time as the male, because he will harass newcomers after him.

Joculator Angel

Centropyge joculator

The Joculator Angel fish is a great fish for almost any aquarium. It’s rare to find a Joculator Angel fish for sale, but you are lucky enough to purchase one of these attention-getting fish, you are getting a beautiful addition as long as your aquarium is well established and maintained.

Joculator Angel fish are often called the Yellowhead Angel fish in reference to its bold appearance. The front 1/3 of its body is yellow. The back end is a blackish blue. The eye is encircled with a blue ring with black spots, and the cheek spine has a bluish shade. The caudal, pectoral and pelvic fins are yellow, and the dorsal and anal fins are blue.

The extremely rare Joculator Angel fish is only found around the Christmas Islands and a very small range of islands in the western Indian Ocean called the Cocos-Keeling Islands.

It is also known as the Joculator Pygmy Angel, Coco’s Pygmy Angelfish, Coco’s Angelfish, and Cocos Islands Pygmy Angelfish.

The Joculator Angel fish is one of the rarest in the industry that actually shows up from time to time. Their native region is “off the beaten path,” requiring special arrangements to visit and collect it out in its native range. They are usually found swimming among the coral and rubble on steep outer reels reefs.

Temperament: Semi-Aggressive

Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Water Temperature Range: 75 -79° F (24 – 26° C)
Water Movement: Weak, Moderate, Strong

The Joculator Angel fish has the reputation of being very easy to care for (and just as pleasant to watch). Once it is acclimated and feels at home in the aquarium, it is a hardy inhabitant, greedily eating almost whatever gets offered to the tank.

When you first acquire this angel, you will need to help it feel secure while it gets acclimated. Joculator Angel fish are very active and need plenty of swimming space. They also need lots of rockwork with many nooks and crannies to hide into and dart in and out of. Ideally, you will want to keep it with a few non-aggressive fish like flasher wrasses or chromes damsels. They make the Joculator Angel fish feel comfortable.

Joculator Angel fish can also have their down side. They can be susceptible to diseases like “ich” (white spot disease). They can be successfully treated with copper or other medical treatments, but do know that sudden changes in the water (pH, temperature, salinity) can create stress for the fish,

Joculator Angels are omnivores. They eat a varied diet with meaty foods, dried flakes, shrimps, frozen prepared diets for sponge and algae eaters, and will even take some food tablets. Start with frequent feedings, at least twice a day, and for a tiny juvenile, feed it different foods three to four times everyday.

Joculator Angel fish are generally known to be reef friendly, but as with most pygmy angel fish in a reef tank aquarium, it may damage stony and soft corals. It is an individual behavior. Each fish has its own personality and tendencies. So if you want to try the Joculator angel fish in your reef tank, keep an eye on your corals and you will get a good idea of how your fish is behaving.

Most people have no problem keeping this rare beauty in reef tanks, and quite often with good results. The consensus among owners and admirers, alike, is that adequate diet and frequent feedings will keep the Joculator Angel fish feeling fuller and not as interested in picking at coral or clam mantels.

Joculator Angel fish have a reputation for being outgoing in an aquarium community with a very pleasant personality. They are often found in harems in the wild, with one dominant male, about four mature females and a few juveniles. However, as rare as they are to find, it would be a major challenge to collect enough of these pygmy angels to form a harem.

Individually, Joculator Angel fish are generally intolerant of others in their own species and are not friendly toward other fish with the same shape or coloration, such as the Bicolor Angelfish.

Japanese Dragon Eel

Rare and hard to find, the Japanese Dragon Eel Enchelycore Pardalis is one of the rarest of the rare and the standard bearer of Just Rare Fish.

With its bright orange color and dragon-like face, this moray eel is a great addition to your saltwater aquarium. Most specimens of Japanese Dragon Eels arrive about 12″ in Length. We frequently have them much larger.

Japanese Dragon Eels like live food when possible. Expect to give this eel a little extra care when it arrives.

If you are patient, a Japanese Dragon Eel comes up every now and then. The fish is not as rare as it used to be.

The Japanese Dragon Eel is a predator fish and it will view new additions as possible food, so when stocking your aquarium, i hold probably be one of the last additions, if not THE last.

Japanese Dragon Eels need a lot of space. Even the Juveniles, as they can grow very quickly and outgrow a tank that isn’t at least 150 gallons. The tank should be aquascaped in a way to not only allow several hiding places, but to also allow your eel to pass through or behind the rock from one end of your aquarium to the other without being seen from the outside. This will help your eel feel much more comfortable much more quickly. The more cave you give your eel to choose from and explore, the happier it will be, the safer it will feel, and the more you will see swimming out in the open. It also needs shelter on the “floor” of the tank, as it is a bottom-dweller and will often choose to make it their home space.

Japanese Dragon Eels are good purchases if you have a tank that can support it as a mature adult. They can be kept as a mated pair, as well. But if you don’t have the system to support it, you will be very disappointed in a few weeks when your eel develops problems.

Water Quality: Temp. 7 -78° F, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4.

Another important detail to remember about setting up for a Japanese Dragon Eel’s tank is to make sure that it is tightly closed at the top. It needs to be completely closed with no gaps. Think of your eel as a master escape artist, because that’s exactly what it is. If there is a gap in the top of your tank that os a fraction of the body’s size, it will escape the tank through that gap or hole. Eels are famous for this, and many aquarium owners have woken up or come home to find their prized eel on the carpet because they didn’t completely enclose the top of the tank.

Do not hand feed a tank with a Japanese Dragon Eel.

Their eyesight is not very good. If they are coming to your hand to get food, they will have a hard time distinguishing where the food stops and the finger begins. Being bitten by a Japanese Dragon Eel is very painful and it can cause a very serious bacterial infection. You will need to clean the bite immediately and very thoroughly, and you may need to seek medical attention, as well. If you see any redness develop around the wound, you should definitely go get medical attention immediately before it gets badly infected, which can happen quickly.

Japanese Dragon Eels are predators and hunters. They prefer live food (or what they think is live food) to dead food. Once they get acclimated to aquarium life, many start to learn to accept dead foods. Some don’t ever learn, though.

When they are first introduced to your tank, you may need to use live food to encourage it to start eating. You can use live shrimp or feeder fish and it will usually get things started. But don’t use feeder fish for too long (and don’t use feeder goldfish at all). They lack the nutrition that the Japanese Dragon Eel needs to thrive. What you are trying to do is trigger your eel’s natural feeding instincts and then get it to other foods as quickly as it lets you.

Feed your Japanese Dragon Eel when it is hungry. Many eels will want to eat only a few times each week, and remember that once in a while, it will go into hibernation or will just go on a fast for a few weeks. This is common, an you will not need to worry when you see it happen with your eel.

Knowing that the Japanese Dragon Eel looks at everything that can fit into its mouth as food and will try to eat it, and knowing that it is a hunter that wants to cash is own food help to give you an idea of how to feed your eel. The easiest way is to use feeding tongs or a feeding stick. You can put any of a variety of meats on the stick or in the tongs (fish meat, crab meat, squid – there are many options, and we recommend that you give it as much variety as you possibly can to make sure that it gets the proper nutrition) and then put it in the water, moving it some to simulate a live animal in front of the eel. It will usually pause for a moment and then grab the for very quickly with a snap.

Japanese Dragon Eels are not a threat to eat corals, but if the corals are not securely fastened to their rock, they take a big risk of being knocked down as the eel swims through the aquarium.

However, they eat crustaceans and small fishes, quickly eliminating clean-up crews.

The Japanese Dragon Eel is a very aggressive predator fish. Any fish that is small enough to fit into its mouth will probably be identified as food and it will be eaten. It should be kept with other predator fish, preferably large-sized.

While the Japanese Dragon Eel is certainly aggressive, it will not usually start that way when it is introduced into an aquarium. It will generally hide at first. You will notice that is is beginning to feel somewhat comfortable when it starts ticking its head out from the cave it has chosen to hide in. Its open mouth may look menacing, but at this point, it is not hunting for food. It is merely “breathing,” and the moth stays open, displaying its sharp teeth.

After a few weeks, when it feels very comfortable and at home, the Japanese Dragon Eel will start to venture from its cage and unfurl itself, maybe even swimming some around the tank.

Japanese Dragon Eels go into what is best called a type of hibernation from time to time. These times can last several weeks, or until it is ready to come back out. The eel disappears and hides within the rock work, and it also fasts, not accepting any food during the time. This is a normal behavior for these eels.

Blue Hippo Tang

Paracanthurus Hepatus

It is known by many other names, as well: Regal Tang, Pacific Blue Tang, Blue Surgeonfish, and Royal Blue Tang, and Palette Surgeonfish. It is most often called the Blue Hippo Tang, stemming from its scientific name, Paracanthurus Hepatus. It also has some less common names: Wedge-tailed Tang, Wedgetail Blue Tang, Hepatus Tang and Flagtail Surgeonfish. Luckily, though, most people stick to Blue Hippo Tang or Regal Tang.

The Blue Hippo Tang is almost as famous and recognizable to the public as the clownfish, thanks to Disney’s “Finding Nemo” movie. “Dory” did a good job of representing what makes these fish very popular: Active, fast, good personality, and beautifully colored.

The Blue Hippo Tang’s brilliant royal blue stands out among many fish in an aquarium. It has black markings that go from its eyes all the way back into its tail and yellow pectoral and caudal fins. The black also circles back into the body to make the a shape that resembles a painter’s palette, giving it one of its common names: Palette Surgeonfish.

Blue Hippo Tangs are fast, active swimmers with some fun personality quirks, like hiding along with corals and rocks, “playing dead” as it lies down, and sometimes playing “peek-a-boo” as it hides, poking its head out and then back into hiding. You could almost say that the fish has a Type A personality!

Blue Hippo Tangs are native to the Indo-Pacific region, ranging from East Africa to Japan and through the Indonesian and Hawaiian Islands.

Blue Hippo Tangs for sale typically range from 1-5 inches in length. They can grow to 12 inches at full maturity. Juveniles have been known to outgrow small tanks within a few months, so plan on housing them in a tank that will handle an adult.

Yellow Belly Regal Tang

The Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang is a gorgeous color variety of the popular Blue Tang. Though it shares the attractive coloration of the Blue Tang, the Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang boasts a richer, deep-blue coloration and a brilliant yellow coloration that covers a greater portion of the body. The yellow coloration, most prominent on the caudal fin (tail), continues across the belly region, giving the Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang an exciting boost in color. Small Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tangs will not exhibit the yellow belly coloration until they mature. Combined with the signature bold black markings resembling a painter’s palette, the Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang is sure to be an impressive addition to reef or fish-only aquariums.
Native to reefs in the Indian Ocean, the Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang appreciates good hiding locations amongst live rock. However, this active fish also loves to swim. Therefore, ample room to roam around your aquarium is essential for optimum health. Though peaceful towards most tankmates, the Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang will demonstrate aggressive behavior towards other fish of its own species. To keep multiple specimens, introduce the entire lot at once into a larger marine system.

Although Tangs will eat meaty foods along with the other fish in the aquarium, it is important that they are offered plenty of marine-based algae or seaweed. This diet will help strengthen the Blue and Yellow Hippo Tang’s immune system, reduce aggression and improve their overall health. Offer dried seaweed tied to a rock or use a veggie clip and feed at least three times per week. Sea Veggies, Seaweed Salad and Ocean Nutrition are all ideal products and are very easy to use.

Careful observance of the Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang is essential as it is more susceptible to lateral line disease, fin erosion, ich and other skin parasites than many other fish.

Approximate Purchase Size: Tiny: 3/4″ to 1-1/4″ Small: 1-1/4″ to 2″; Medium: 2″ to 3″; Large: 3″ to 5

The Blue Hippo Tang is an uncommon fish. It lives in waters up to 130 feet below the surface. Even more rare is the “Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang.” It sports yellow on their chests and bellies, although it is very faded on the juvenile fish.

The Blue Hippo Tang needs special care in a well kept and established tank. It is a very popular fish, but unfortunately comes with a reputation for not making it long term in an aquarium. To go along with its quirky personality, it is very sensitive to stress and malnutrition. It is also easily affected and disturbed by bad water quality and an unstable environment that many new aquarium owners tend to create. This fish is recommended for aquarium owners who have been successful at maintaining a clean and steady aquarium for at least six months in a row. Less experienced owners hold consider choosing another tang. Both the fish and the aquarist will be happier with the results, both in the short term and the long term.

Experienced aquarium owners will be very happy with their Blue Hippo Tang for a long time.

Blue Hippo Tangs are active swimmers, and they like to go fast. Even the smallest ones need a lot of room to swim, and their tank should be at least 100 gallons. Plenty of open swimming room should be provided or the fish will start to feel like it has no room and will start to stress, leading to health issues. They will outgrow smaller tanks quickly, and it would be stressful for them to had to try to get by in a smaller aquarium. The more turbulent and quick you can have the water flowing through the tank, the better. Keep the oxygen levels high and the water clean and clear.
Water Conditions: 72-78° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025, dKH 8-12

Note: Another common name for tangs is “surgeonfish.” They get this name from a razor-sharp spine sticking out of the tail (often referred to as its “scalpel”). The Blue Hippo Tang also has venomous fin spines. This fish can hurt its owns rid they are not careful when doing maintenance or water changes.

Blue Hippo Tangs’ aquariums should be outfitted with plenty of live rock, arranged in a way that it allows for many caves and crevices to explore, as well as tunnels for the fish to swim through and play with. Especially in the beginning, the fish is going to be shy, hiding away from the rest of the community until it starts to feel comfortable. It will start to get used to its new surroundings and will begin to explore the whole tank. Blue Hippo Tangs enjoy finding hiding spots in live rock. They will sometimes “play dead,” lying down somewhere in the tank either on the sand or among the rocks. This is normal behavior for this fish. It doesn’t necessarily mean that it has died or that it is getting irritated by and trying to remove parasites on its skin (although if you see a lot of excess scratching, that could be a sign of a problem and should be investigated).

The eating habits of a Blue Hippo Tang change as it grows older. It begins as a planktovore and then grows into an omnivore as an adult, although they eat so much plant material that it is easy to confuse them for herbivores. These fish, like other tangs, are grazers. They eat a lot of algae, picking it off the live rock where it grows. However, some make the mistake of assuming that they will also eat nuisance algae. This particular tang is not as keen on that. As the owner, you will need to supplement what it eats in the aquarium with prepared herbivore food as well as meaty foods. The herbivore foods will help to keep its immune system strong 9as will soaking its food with a vitamin supplement to make up for what it doesn’t get enough of). To satisfy the carnivorous side, frozen mysis, well-chopped raw shrimp are favorite choices, but you will find that the Blue Hippo tang is a curious fish, and it will try almost any introduced food at least once, and can be trained to accept a wide variety of foods so you can fit it into your existing feeding.

Quarantine your Blue Hippo Tang before adding them into your display tank. This fish is particularly susceptible to diseases and parasites – especially if you are choosing to put it into a tank that isn’t big enough for it. Keep your eye on this fish and observe it as closely as possible, even after it goes into your aquarium. The main issue that people report is problems with ich. Most Blue Hippo Tangs will go through having ich one or more times before it becomes acclimated and established in any tank. It is also open to lateral line disease, fin erosion, and skin parasites. It is recommended that you have medications and treatments on hand before your fish arrives, just in case the stresses of shipping brings the onset of any disease. You will want to treat it quickly.

The Blue Hippo Tang is overall a safe fish in reef tanks. They love to take their time and to observe the whole reef, including the corals, looking for hiding spots.

Blue Hippo Tangs only really present one downside: Their susceptibility to diseases, like ich, and to various parasites could create a problem if they are in a reef tank, since copper treatments cannot be used there.

(It may flash its caudal spines once in a while to warn other fish not to mess with it, but it is very rare for them to attack another fish that is not a tang)

The Blue Hippo Tang is considered to be the least aggressive of the tang family, but it can be territorial with other tangs in the aquarium. They get along well with other fish in the tank and are excellent community fish. If it is in an aquarium with other fish that start to bully or harass it, it may not eat as much as it should, or worse, stop eating altogether, making it more prone to diseases and parasites.

Blue Hippo Tangs can live with other Blue Hippo Tangs. They will even school as juveniles in some aquariums (although some fighting may break out between them when they become adults). If you want more than one in your tank, introduce them all at the same time. This will minimize aggression between tangs. If you already have one in your tank, it is best to stay with the one. But if you have planned for and want to add another, be sure to get one that is significantly bigger than the one you already have. If you add one that is just a little bigger, the same size or smaller than the one already there, the established tang will most likely attack and bully the other one until it dies.

Another tip about housing multiple Blue Hippo Tangs: If you are going to add multiples, it is much better to add a group of juveniles than a group of adults. A group of juveniles are more often than not collected as that group. They have been together and are used to each other, and they adjust more easily to aquarium environments, resulting in less stress and a much lower chance of them becoming aggressive with each other (although you should keep an eye on them, particularly as they reach adult sizes at around 4 inches in length. A group of adults is almost always a collection of fish that are from different places and don’t know each other, and usually become a group of fish that fights with each other.

Blue Hippo Tangs are peaceful, but like any other tang, once they have established their territory, they don’t want to see another one… especially one that looks like them.

Hawaiian Dragon Eel

Enchelycore pardalis, previously named Muraena pardalis until 1946.
The Hawaiian Dragon Moray and the Japanese Dragon Moray are the same fish.

Also known as: Dragon Moray Eel and Leopard Moray Eel
Hawaiian Names: Pu-hi a-o, Pu-hi ‘o-’a, Pu-hi we-la, and Pu-hi kauila.

The Hawaiian Dragon Eel is one of the most stunning eels that you can put into an aquarium. It is also one of the most popular. This predator is known to be one of the fiercest eels to be found.

A Hawaiian Dragon Eel’s head is shaped like a dragon’s head (and is larger than its body), even with “horns” above its large, jet-black eyes. Its face is ferocious-looking, lined with razor-sharp teeth and flaring nostrils. It’s bottom jaw is curved, preventing the eel from closing its mouth, and serving as a warning to other fish, and to humans, as well.

The Hawaiian Dragon Eel’s body goes through several color and pattern changes as it grows and develops. It is also known for having different colorations. Some say that it depends on where it is from, others say that it is related to different stages as the eel is growing. Its bright yellow/orange/red body with black and white patterns of spots and markings distinguish this eel from every other fish in the sea.

By nature, the Hawaiian Dragon Eel is a nocturnal fish. When it is added to your tank, it will hide in the rocks. After it acclimates and starts to get used to its new home, it will begin to raise its head out of its chosen hiding cave during the day. After the first few weeks, when it truly starts to feel comfortable in the aquarium, it will start to lie on the floor, unfurled for everyone to observe.

As its common names indicate, Hawaiian Dragon Eel is found in the Hawaiian Islands and off the Japanese Islands.

Hawaiian Dragon Eels for sale are usually measuring between 8 inches and two feet. Juveniles are near 12 inches long or less, and they grow to a total length of 36 inches at full maturity.

The Hawaiian Dragon Eel is not as rare as it used to be. It’s not as common as the Snowflake or Zebra Moray Eels, but if you are patient, one comes up every now and then.

The Hawaiian Dragon Eel can deliver a very painful bite which can become a serious bacterial infection situation.
This fish is recommended for expert aquarium keepers, only. It is a threat to someone who doesn’t know what they are doing with them, and they will also need special care when it arrives, especially in getting it to start eating in for aquarium.

The Hawaiian Dragon Eel is a predator fish and it will view new additions as possible food, so when stocking your aquarium, i hold probably be one of the last additions, if not THE last.

Hawaiian Dragon Eels need a lot of space. Even the Juveniles, as they can grow very quickly and outgrow a tank that isn’t at least 150 gallons. The tank should be aquascaped in a way to not only allow several hiding places, but to also allow your eel to pass through or behind the rock from one end of your aquarium to the other without being seen from the outside. This will help your eel feel much more comfortable much more quickly. The more cave you give your eel to choose from and explore, the happier it will be, the safer it will feel, and the more you will see swimming out in the open. It also needs shelter on the “floor” of the tank, as it is a bottom-dweller and will often choose to make it their home space.

Hawaiian Dragon Eels are good purchases if you have a tank that can support it as a mature adult. They can be kept as a mated pair, as well. But if you don’t have the system to support it, you will be very disappointed in a few weeks when your eel develops problems.

Water Quality: Temp. 7 -78° F, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4.

Another important detail to remember about setting up for Hawaiian Dragon Eel’s tank is to make sure that it is tightly closed at the top. It needs to be completely closed with no gaps. Think of your eel as a master escape artist, because that’s exactly what it is. If there is a gap in the top of your tank that os a fraction of the body’s size, it will escape the tank through that gap or hole. Eels are famous for this, and many aquarium owners have woken up or come home to find their prized eel on the carpet because they didn’t completely enclose the top of the tank.

Do not hand feed a tank with a Hawaiian Dragon Eel.

Their eyesight is not very good. If they are coming to your hand to get food, they will have a hard time distinguishing where the food stops and the finger begins. Being bitten by a Hawaiian Dragon Eel is very painful and it can cause a very serious bacterial infection. You will need to clean the bite immediately and very thoroughly, and you may need to seek medical attention, as well. If you see any redness develop around the wound, you should definitely go get medical attention immediately before it gets badly infected, which can happen quickly.

Hawaiian Dragon Eels are predators and hunters. They prefer live food (or what they think is live food) to dead food. Once they get acclimated to aquarium life, many start to learn to accept dead foods. Some don’t ever learn, though.

When they are first introduced to your tank, you may need to use live food to encourage it to start eating. You can use live shrimp or feeder fish and it will usually get things started. But don’t use feeder fish for too long (and don’t use feeder goldfish at all). They lack the nutrition that the Hawaiian Dragon Eel needs to thrive. What you are trying to do is trigger your eel’s natural feeding instincts and then get it to other foods as quickly as it lets you.

Feed your Hawaiian Dragon Eel when it is hungry. Many eels will want to eat only a few times each week, and remember that once in a while, it will go into hibernation or will just go on a fast for a few weeks. This is common, an you will not need to worry when you see it happen with your eel.

Knowing that the Hawaiian Dragon Eel looks at everything that can fit into its mouth as food and will try to eat it, and knowing that it is a hunter that wants to cash is own food help to give you an idea of how to feed your eel. The easiest way is to use feeding tongs or a feeding stick. You can put any of a variety of meats on the stick or in the tongs (fish meat, crab meat, squid – there are many options, and we recommend that you give it as much variety as you possibly can to make sure that it gets the proper nutrition) and then put it in the water, moving it some to simulate a live animal in front of the eel. It will usually pause for a moment and then grab it very quickly with a snap.

Hawaiian Dragon Eels will eat crustaceans and small fishes, virtually eliminating clean-up crews very quickly. They’re not a threat to eat corals, but if the corals are not securely fastened on their rock, they stand a good chance of being knocked down as the eel swims through the tank.

The Hawaiian Dragon Eel is a very aggressive predator fish. Any fish that is small enough to fit into its mouth will probably be identified as food and it will be eaten. It should be kept with other predator fish, preferably large-sized.

While the Hawaiian Dragon Eel is certainly aggressive, it will not usually start that way when it is introduced into an aquarium. It will generally hide at first. You will notice that is is beginning to feel somewhat comfortable when it starts ticking its head out from the cave it has chosen to hide in. Its open mouth may look menacing, but at this point, it is not hunting for food. It is merely “breathing,” and the moth stays open, displaying its sharp teeth.

After a few weeks, when it feels very comfortable and at home, the Hawaiian Dragon Eel will start to venture from its cage and unfurl itself, maybe even swimming some around the tank.

Hawaiian Dragon Eels go into what is best called a type of hibernation from time to time. These times can last several weeks, or until it is ready to come back out. The eel disappears and hides within the rock work, and it also fasts, not accepting any food during the time. This is a normal behavior for these eels.

Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish

Premnas biaculeatus

Also known as the Spine Cheek Anemonefish, Spine Cheek Clown, Gold Stripe Clown, Yellow Stripe Maroon Clown Fish, Maroon Anemonefish
Origin: Indonesia, Sumatra

The Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish is regarded as one of the most beautiful (and largest) clownfish that is kept in saltwater aquariums. This clownfish is found once in a while in the waters around Malaysia.

The Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish has a deep maroon body with three yellow stripes running vertically down the sides of its body. The first is at its forehead, the second runs through the middle and the third at the base of the tail.

Juvenile Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish look the same, except that the stripes are white for the first year. After then, the stripes start to fade into their golden yellow color, starting with the stripe at the forehead and working its way back.

Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish for sale usually measure 1-2 inches. When they reach full maturity, they can be as large as 6 inches long.

This fish is one of the more common of the rare fish.

The Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish is one of the hardiest clownfish. It is a different color than the “Nemo” clownfish, opening all sorts of questions and curiosities.

Other than a traditional aquarium, Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish are often found in small aquariums that are designed just for one or two fish and some invertebrates. The minimum size for a clownfish by itself or with an anemone is 30 gallons. If you know how to maintain a basic saltwater tank, you can you will be able to handle one of these fish.

The Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish will be aggressive toward other clownfish. If you plan to have other clownfish in the tank, we recommend a minimum tank size of 100 gallons, built with many hiding places and make sure that each fish, or pair of fish, has an anemone of their own. This way, each one has a place to call home and its own turf. This will greatly reduce the friction and fighting among your clownfishes.

Although we mentioned anemones, it should be noted that Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish do not require an anemone to host. However, there are several benefits to providing them with one. They will host the anemone in a symbiotic relationship in which the anemone provides protection for the clownfish and the clownfish keeps it clean, fed and occasionally protected from other fish.

Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish are very hardy and durable. If they are acclimated correctly, they will be good choices for beginner aquarists. They will accept most fish foods that are offered. This includes frozen preparations, flake foods, pellet foods and custom preparations. Keep in mind that they are omnivores, so you will want to provide both meaty foods and vegetable foods, and feed them 2-3 times a day.

A note about feeding tanks with anemones: The Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish will work to feed their anemone scraps of food or even better. However, if your tank has a shrimp, particularly a coral banded shrimp, know that these creatures are good at going up to the anemone and taking the food out. Make sure that the anemone does get to eat the food that is placed into it by the clown fish. If the shrimp takes the food, try to spot feed some more food to the anemone.

Water Conditions: 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025

If you need to move the Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish, use a specimen container as opposed to using a net. They have spines sticking out near their cheek and they will get caught and entagled in the net, potentially causing major injury.

Gold Stripe Maroon Clownfish are not very resistant to diseases, so before adding them to your display tank, be sure to quarantine them for at least two weeks to let any disease or parasite run its course. You will also want to be careful of how much medication you are putting into the system in case you need to treat for disease. This fish does not tolerate high levels of copper, so you will need to be careful while administering medicines, keeping your eye out for any new troubles that can come up.

Gold Stipe Maroon Clownfish are said to be very reef compatible. Just as each clownfish has its personality, there are better matches than others. If they are introduced into an established reef with a lot of live rock and a very healthy algae growth cycle, they might not even need to be fed while in the tank. The main concern with this fish in a reef is its tendency to eat small shrimps.

The Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish is among the most aggressive of the clownfishes. They do not get along with another clownfish in the aquarium unless they are a mated pair. Having a large aquarium does not automatically remedy the situation, although it sure helps.

Only one Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish should be kept in an aquarium unless you have a mated pair. A second can be added if it is significantly smaller than the current inhabitant. They can also be aggressive and start bullying smaller fish in the tank.

If a Gold Striped Maroon Clownfish is hosting with an anemone, it will attack anything that approaches the anemone. This is usually the only time that one of these fish will show severely aggressive attitudes and behavior toward fish that are not clownfish.

Goldflake Angel

Apolemichthys xanthopunctatus

Also known as Gold-spangled, Gold-spotted Angelfish, Gold-Speckled Angelfish,

Hawaiian native, Origin: Christmas Island
Goldflakes are found in the deeper water around the outer edges of reefs and nearby channels and drop-offs, often in shallow water but sometimes at 10-65m/33-213′

The Goldflake Angel fish is a dazzlingly gorgeous fish that grabs eyes. It quickly becomes the start of your aquarium, actively swimming all over the tank with its great personality.

An adult Goldflake Angel fish has a yellow body sprinkled with golden specks. Its fins are black, matched by a spot on the forehead. The fins are outlined with an accenting brilliant, bright blue which also adorns the fish’s mouth.

Juvenile Goldflake Angel fish have bright yellow bodies, and you can see the makings of their gold flakes. At that age, it looks more like random gold strips or even random dark strips along the body. The back fins may be black if they have matured enough. Their dorsal fin is yellow with a tell-tale black spot on the back end. There is also a black stripe coming down from the top of the head through the eye. As it matures, the scales edges start to get darker and the markings on the fish change to the adult marks.

Goldflake Angel fish for sale usually measure between 3-5 inches long. When they mature, they can reach 10 inches in length.

The Gold Flake angel fish is a rare fish, only becoming available once in a while.

Goldflake Angel fish are not known to be easy to keep. Experienced aquarists have been able to keep them because they have experience with saltwater aquariums and know how to take care of their fish. Once it gets acclimated, though, it becomes easier to work with.

Goldflake Angel fish need large aquariums. One fish can live pretty well in an established 125 gallon tank. The aquarium’s live rock should be established enough to provide algae growth and arranged in such a way that it gives the fish many places to hide and to feel safe and secure and also to provide hiding spaces for other fish when it starts to harass them. It also needs to provide a lot of swimming room. If you want to keep another angel in the tank, you will want an aquarium that is over 150 gallons in size. The Goldflake Angel fish should be the first of the large angelfish in the tank.

Goldflake Angel fish require high quality water in their aquarium. 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025

The Goldflake Angel fish is an omnivore and should be fed several times each day. In the ocean, they actively graze on the rock all day, eating mostly sponges and tunicates. There are prepared foods that include a large supply of sponge in them, which will help them greatly. They will also eat mysis and brine shrimp, like most aquarium fish. In time, you will find that the Goldflake Angel fish can learn to eat foods, even flake foods, from your hands.

It would be best for the Goldflake Angel fish if they did not have to compete for algae growing naturally on the live rock, but in an aquarium setting, they most likely will. They will need the vegetarian side of their menu supplemented with nori, spirulina, and other plant matter.

Goldflake Angel fish are as susceptible to disease as their tank mates. Some of the common ones, lie Ich, Crypt and Velvet, or flukes can be treated by lowering the salinity of the tank to 1.010-1.012 – also known as “hypo-salinity.” This process usually takes two weeks. Once the issues have not ben seen in a while, bring the salinity back to normal. You will want to o this over several days, especially with Angels.

Preventing diseases is always easier than the cure. Keeping the fish as stress-free as can be and letting it grow and be strong, with plenty of hiding places in the aquarium.

Putting a Goldfake Angel Fish into a reef tank is taking a risk.

Some corals are said to be safe with them, but it has a reputation for hurting clams and soft corals, like zoanthids. It also has a reputation for enjoying tube worms. It will also nip a larger polyp stony corals. The soft polyp stony corals, however, seem to be quite safe with the fish. Juveniles are known not to give any reef problems, but when they grow into adulthood, that is when their aggressiveness and territorial nature start to come through.

The Goldflake Angel is semi-aggressive. It thrives best in a community with other fish that are semi-aggressive and are other shapes, colors and sizes. It will go after and bully peaceful fish, whereas other semi-aggressive fish will stand up to it and keep fighting and bullying down.

If the Goldflake Angel fish is not going to be your final addition to the tank, know that the larger the tank, the less aggression you will see in your aquarium. More aggressive fish that get added after the Goldflake Angel fish will harass it. Re-arranging the rock work when introducing the new fish can help to calm things down.

Opinions vary among experts about how well the Goldflake Angel fish coexists with other angels in an aquarium. The one thing that everyone seems to agree on is that the Goldflake Angel fish is one of the better candidates to house with other angels, but the tank needs to be very large and spacious so that they can each have a place to call “home.” Once it has established itself and found its home spot, it can become territorial, just like other angels. So house with other angels with extreme caution.

Garibaldi Damsel

The Garibaldi Damsel fish is an attention-commanding blast of orange in your tank that is sure to start conversations.

The Garibaldi Damsel fish is the official marine fish of the State of California. It can be found all along the California coast from Monterey Bay to the Gulf of California. It is also found in some of the cooler waters off the Eastern Central Pacific Ocean near Mexico, which is fortunate for those who want to house a Garibaldi Damsel fish. It is illegal to keep or collect this fish in California without a permit.

As beautiful as the fish is, it also has a bold personality that matches. In the wild, Garibaldi Damsel fish have been known to swim straight to divers and to check them out.

Adult Garibaldi Damsel fish are bright, almost fluorescent, orange. Juveniles are speckled with ride cent blue spots and outlines in their fins. As they grow and mature, the blue markings disappear. Even though the fish is bright orange, it has been named “Garibaldi” in reference to Giuseppe Garibaldi, an Italian revolutionary from the 1800s who was known for his red shirt.

Garibaldi Damsel fish for sale range anywhere from 1-5 inches, but grow to as large as 15 inches in length. They are one of the largest damsel fish and have been known to live up to 25 years.

Garibaldi Damsel fish are relatively common along the California coast. However, they are fully protected in those areas, being California’s official marine fish. It is again the law in California to either keep Garibaldi Damsel fish or to collect them in the coastal waters without a permit.

Garibaldi Damsel fish are cool-water fish. In the wild, they are often found in cold waters coming from the East Pacific ocean. Other than the cooler water (60-77°F), there is no special care or extra steps to take to keep it in an aquarium. It can be a very healthy and hardy addition once it is introduced into your aquarium.

The challenge comes in the planning before adding a Garibaldi Damsel fish to your aquarium. Even as a juvenile, the fish can be a bully to others. As it grows to adulthood, its sheer size will create challenges if the tank is not big enough. Add its territorial nature, and you have a fish that can turn aggressive very quickly.

Garibaldi Damsel fish are usually very active swimmers. An adult, by itself, needs a tank at least 125 gallons to avoid running into the glass walls. If other fish are kept, then the tank will need to be considerably bigger, especially given the Garibaldi Damsel fish’s territorial and aggressive nature. Plenty of live rock will be needed to give them different territories. Building caves and sheltering shelves is often appreciated and makes several hiding places at the same time.

Water Conditions: dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025, 60-77° F

Garibaldi Damsel fish feed mainly on tiny animals that they pick off live rock, so be sure to give it enough to work with.

Feeding a Garibaldi Damsel fish is pretty simple. The diet you provide to them should include various meaty foods, herbivore preparations, and flaked foods. In the wild, they mainly eat sponges and algae growing on the rock. They also feed on invertebrates such as tubeworms, nudibranchs and bryozoans. Many believe that the sponges they eat contribute to their bright color, so keep this in mind when choosing what foods you supplement their natural eating with.

It’s true that Garibaldi Damselfish are strong fish, but they can be susceptible to the standard diseases that aquarium life is known for. The main factor for them is stress from not being comfortable with their aquarium or the fish they are in there with.

Garibaldi Damsel fish are considered reef safe, overall, but they may nip at soft corals and ornamental shrimps are at risk with this fish is around.

The Garibaldi Damsel fish’s personality is known for it’s range from being a very peaceful fish to being a very aggressive and territorial fish. If you want to put a Garibaldi Damsel fish into your aquarium, be sure to do your research, first. It is very important that you choose your fish’s tank mates very carefully.

Garibaldi Damsel fishes will bully others in your aquarium, so you will want to put them in a tank with other aggressive fish which are the same size or bigger that can hold their own with your damsel, knowing that it will grow to be a large fish. You’ll also want to consider that the Garibaldi Damsel fish is a cool water fish, and the other fish in your aquarium may not adapt well to the lower temperature.

Garibaldi Damsel fish should not be put into the same tank with non-aggressive or small fish. Even juveniles are aggressive toward these fish. Note: Never place two in the same tank. They will not allow another one to be in there with them, and they will fight to the death.

Once they get established in an aquarium, Garibaldi Damsel fish become very territorial. They are known to aggressively defend their territory.

At the same time, when a Garibaldi Damsel fish is in an aquarium with proper tank mates and with enough space for everyone to have a place (or places) to call their own, it can be a very peaceful community fish, and some of its more playful personality traits can come out.

French Angel

Pomacanthus paru

Also known as the Black and Gold Angelfish, Black Angel
Origin: Caribbean

French Angelfish are a favorite among people with an appreciation for rare fish. Being one of the three largest angels that are usual found in an aquarium (the others being the Emperor Angelfish and the Queen Angelfish), it commands attention when someone looks at your aquarium.

The French Angelfish has an ovoid to disc-shaped body with streamers flowing from the dorsal and anal fins. The body is black, sometimes sheening to a dark gray and its scales have bright yellow edges. It also has bright yellow marks at the pectoral fins’ bases, on its gill covers and encircling the eye. Its face is a pale, almost powder blue with a white mouth and chin, and white accents near the eyes.

French Angelfish juveniles have dark black bodies with bright yellow vertical stripes. As it grows into an adult, its scales develop the tell-tale yellow edges all over the body, except for the front areas. The large stripes fade away and the other colors start to fill themselves in.

French Angelfish for sale are typically 2-3 inches in length. They have been found as large as 24 inches, but the typical French Angelfish matures at about 16 inches in length. These fish have been known to live for ten years.

French Angelfish are found throughout the Caribbean islands, often sighted by divers in the area. It has also been found as far as Florida and around Brazil, and into the Gulf of Mexico. While they are normally found in shallow reef areas less than 150 feet deep, they are known to live as far as 330 feet deep into the sea.

The French Angel is not as rare as one might think. It is found more frequently than expected for a rare fish, but the list of collectors is reduced since it is not a reef safe fish.

French Angelfish provide an interesting set of challenges for aquarium owners. However, if those challenges can be met, then it is much easier to take care of this fish. The French angelfish is a pretty hardy species, and it adapts well to aquarium life. They are best kept in pairs. They will be territorial. However, putting two together in a tank that doesn’t have enough space is asking for trouble in your aquarium.

French Angelfish have a lifestyle that works very well for them in the wild. One couple defends an area the size of a football field as their own. Trying to replicate that environment in a home aquarium is not usually going to be possible.

The French Angelfish can reach 16 inches in length at maturity. Many people who buy a French Angelfish get fooled by their relatively small size, because most French Angelfish for sale are about 2-3 inches in length. So when they are told that a 50 gallon tank is big enough for their fish, they don’t know that within a year, their prize fish won’t even be able to swim in a fish tank that small.

To give a French Angelfish the amount of space it is going to need, including plenty of open live rock space for it to hide in, graze on, and explore, and to give it plenty of open swimming room, you will need a fish tank that is at least 250 or 300 gallons.

If you look around on the internet, you will see all sorts of recommendations for minimum sized tanks. You might be able to “get away with” some of those sizes, but in order for a French Angelfish to live happily and thrive, it needs a giant tank, especially if you are going to house a pair in the aquarium. This is not one of the fish that you want to “get away with.” This fish will get very large in your tank, and you are going to have issues if your aquarium is too small to handle it after it grows.

The French Angelfish has a high tolerance for a wide range of salinity, but it is best to keep the it in the 1.020-1.025 levels and to avoid fast changes in your water’s quality. Your aquarium’s water quality levels should be: 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025.

The best setup for a French Angelfish is a large community aquarium with a lot of live rock set up to give them plenty of space to swim and many hiding places. Having plenty of live rock will also let them look for food and graze all day.

French Angelfish should be fed often, at least three times a day. You’ll want to try to simulate what it eats in the wild, sponges, algae, bryozoans , zoantharians , gorgonians , and tunicates. There are high-quality prepared foods for angelfish which have added sponge in them. They also need mysis shrimp offered along with a source of algae like nori sheets. Plain, unflavored, raw dried nori is a good choice.

The French Angelfish naturally feeds on a lot of the parts that make a reef. It can quite often eat prized corals that are kept in an aquarist’s tank. There are exceptions, but many owners of reef tanks do not want to take the risk

French Angelfish give you lots to love and lots to be wary of in an aquarium community.

French Angelfish are monogamous, staying as a pair until death. They work together as a couple, both in hunting and grazing for food and in aggressively defending their territory and each other from predator and would-be suitors. While it can be aggressive with other fish, it is also very curious, swimming up to divers and snorkelers and checking them out. Adult French Angelfish are so large that predators leave them alone, unless they are comparable in size, which eliminates most of them, especially in an aquarium. When other angels come into their space, the French Angelfish pair chases and charges them out.

French Angelfish pairs are very territorial, and they cooperate with their mate in defending a large territory (nearly the size of a football field in the wild) from others.They will hunt through their surroundings and the live rock setups in their area. At night, they will usually go back to their same hiding spot each night.

In the wild, juvenile French Angelfish will set up cleaning stations, where larger fish will wait their turn was the juveniles pick parasites off of them and feed on the removed parasites.

On the other hand, when dealing with other fish of other species and types, the French Angelfish is a generally peaceful fish. Even fish with traditionally nasty attitudes, like dotty backs, are left alone by the French Angelfish. It also develops a very friendly attitude toward its owner, able to recognize them by sight.